Monday, May 25, 2020

No Sadder Song: 'Taps' Played To Honor Those Who Died For Our Country


As History.com notes, the origins of “Taps,” the distinctive bugle melody played at U.S. military funerals and memorials and as a lights-out signal to soldiers at night, date back to the American Civil War. 

In July 1862, U.S. General Daniel Butterfield and his brigade were camped at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, recuperating after the Seven Days Battles near Richmond. Dissatisfied with the standard bugle call employed by the Army to indicate to troops it was time to go to sleep, and thinking the call should sound more melodious, Butterfield reworked an existing bugle call used to signal the end of the day. After he had his brigade bugler, Private Oliver Wilcox Norton, play it for the men, buglers from other units became interested in the 24-note tune and it quickly spread throughout the Army, and even caught on with the Confederates. 

You can read the rest of the piece via the below link: 

https://www.history.com/news/how-did-taps-originate

You can also watch and listen to an American sailor play “Taps” via the below link:

 https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=sailor+playing+taps&docid=608021056479691049&mid=F304E29685E8537D93DFF304E
29685E8537D93DF&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

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