Thursday, May 28, 2015

Fifteen Chinese Nationals Charged In Fraud Scheme


The U.S. Justice Department released the below information:

Fifteen Chinese nationals have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on charges of conspiracy, counterfeiting foreign passports, mail fraud and wire fraud, U.S. Attorney David J. Hickton for the Western District of Pennsylvania announced today.

The 35 count indictment, returned on May 21, 2015, and unsealed today, names the following 12 individuals as defendants: Han Tong, Xi Fu, Xiaojin Guo, Yudong Zhang, Yue Zou, Biyuan Li aka “Jack Li,” Jia Song, Ning Wei, Gong Zhang, Songling Peng, Siyuan Zhao and Yunlin Sun.  The identities of the three additional defendants remain under seal.

According to the indictment, between 2011 and 2015, the defendants engaged in a conspiracy and a scheme to defraud Educational Testing Services (ETS) and the College Board by having imposters take college and graduate school standardized entrance examinations, such as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).  In carrying out the scheme, the conspirators had counterfeit Chinese passports made and sent to the United States, which were used by the imposters to defraud ETS administrators into believing that they were other people, namely the conspirators who would receive the benefit of the imposter’s test score for use at American colleges and universities.  The majority of the fraudulent exams taken by the conspirators were taken in western Pennsylvania.

“The perpetrators of this conspiracy were using fraudulent passports for the purpose of impersonating test takers of standardized tests including the SAT, GRE and TOEFL and thereby securing fraudulently obtained admissions to American institutions of higher education and circumventing the F1 Student Visa requirements,” stated U.S. Attorney Hickton.  “This case establishes that we will protect the integrity of our passport and visa process, as well as safeguard the national asset of our higher education system from fraudulent access.”

“These students were not only cheating their way into the university, they were also cheating their way through our nation’s immigration system,” said Special Agent in Charge John Kelleghan for Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) of Philadelphia.  “HSI will continue to protect our nation’s borders and work with our federal law enforcement partners to seek out those committing transnational crimes and bring them to justice.”

“The State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service (DSS) is committed to working with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and our other law enforcement partners to investigate allegations of crime related to passport fraud and to bring those who commit these crimes to justice,” said Special Agent in Charge David Schnorbus for DSS’s New York Field Office.  “If criminal enterprises are able to manipulate instruments of international travel for profitable gain, then national security is at risk.”

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of 20 years in prison, a fine of $250,000 or both for each count of wire and mail fraud, 10 years in prison, a fine of $250,000 or both for each count of counterfeiting foreign passports, and five years in prison, a fine of $250,000 or both for conspiracy.  Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offense(s) and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant. 

Assistant U.S. Attorney James T. Kitchen is prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.
The Department of Homeland Security, HSI and the Department of State conducted the investigation leading to the indictment in this case.  U.S. Attorney Hickton acknowledged that ETS and the College Board cooperated fully in the investigation.

An indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

1 comment:

  1. This is the tip of the iceberg suggesting a much larger dirty secret in within U.S. immigration and academia policies: we are being inundated by "students" who may or may not be intent upon education. I am not a paranoid conspiracy theorist, but I do think that our "open door" campus policies are a slippery slide to very dangerous times for American interests and national security. I have observed the astonishing increase of foreign students on campuses where I have taught; at a minimum, this means that fewer Americans are sitting in classrooms because many seats are being taken by people from countries that are determined to triumph over America. Okay, now I guess I am sounding a bit xenophobic, but perceptions tell me there are some real issues worth worry about here.

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