Wednesday, May 27, 2015

A Life Of Lies And Spies: Tales Of A CIA Ops Polygraph Interrogator


Veteran journalist and author Joseph C. Goulden offers a good review of Alan B.Trabue's A Life of Lies and Spies in the Washington Times.  

Fairly or not, polygraph examiners for the Central Intelligence Agency and other institutions that require security clearances for staff are not necessarily the most popular guys in the coffee shop. And for good reason: much of their professional lives are devoted to ferreting out secrets their subjects would prefer to leave untold.

Alan B. Trabue, a polygraph specialist for 38 of his 40 years with the CIA, aptly terms the process a “mental colonoscopy,” and he became accustomed to seeing subjects become so nervous that they “fainted during their tests and slid out of their chair.”

He continues, “There were the fearful ones, the angry ones and the dangerous ones. There were examinees so stressed, they spewed vomit across the examination room. Terrified examinees fled the examination room, while others were so angry they refused to leave. Angry subjects waited in the parking lot after their polygraph interviews to confront their examiners as they left the building.”

Some of these persons, to be sure, had reasons to be nervous about the box.

You can read the rest of the review via the below link:

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/may/26/book-review-a-life-of-spies-and-lies-tales-of-a-ci/ 

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